Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

How time and our spacecraft fly—especially when you’re making history at 32,000 miles per hour! Continuing on its path through the outer regions of the solar system, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has now traveled half …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since 2004, is about to begin the final chapter of its remarkable story. On Wednesday, April 26, the spacecraft will make the first in a series of dives …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

Global Astronomy Month 2017 (GAM2017) fills the entire month of April again with exciting programs for astronomy enthusiasts worldwide. Whether it’s stargazing, sharing with the public, or experiencing the cosmos in art and poetry, there …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

Images returned from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission indicate that during its most recent trip through the inner solar system, the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place—full of growing fractures, collapsing …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

An enormous young planet approximately 300 light-years from Earth has given astrophysicists a rare glimpse into planetary evolution. The planet, known as HD 106906b, was discovered in 2014 by a team of scientists from the …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

This summer, an ice chest-sized box will fly to the International Space Station, where it will create the coldest spot in the universe. Inside that box, lasers, a vacuum chamber and an electromagnetic “knife” will …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where …[READ MORE]

Looking Up by Bob Eklund

Looking Up – Bob Eklund

Mars scientists are wrestling with a problem. Ample evidence says ancient Mars was sometimes wet, with water flowing and pooling on the planet’s surface. Yet the ancient Sun was about one-third less warm, and climate …[READ MORE]