Young Adults More Likely to Report Anxiety and Depression – Help is Available

Younger adults living alone were more likely than older adults living alone to report symptoms of both anxiety and depression in recent weeks, according to new U.S. Census Bureau data.

Those between ages 18 and 29 and 30 and 44 reported higher rates of anxiety and depression.

The Household Pulse Survey provides insight into the mental health and well-being of adults living alone during the Coronavirus pandemic. The survey asks two questions related to symptoms of anxiety, and two questions about symptoms of depression.

Phase 3 of the survey collects data over two-week intervals, and this article relies on publicly available data collected from Oct. 28 through Nov. 9, a time period in which the Census Bureau sent invitations to 1,035,752 households and received a total of 58,729 responses.

Among adults living alone, respondents age 65 and over reported lower rates of anxiety and depression than those in other age groups.

Those between ages 18 and 29 and 30 and 44 reported higher rates of anxiety and depression. The age groups were not statistically different from each other on either measure.

Respondents in the 45-64 age group reported symptoms of both anxiety and depression at rates that fell between those of the youngest and oldest respondents.

Economic disruptions such as a loss of income had an impact on the mental health of those living alone, as did the expectation of losing employment income in the next four weeks.

About half (51%) of individuals living alone who either lost or expected to lose employment income reported anxiety, compared with only about a third (32%) of those who had not experienced or expected the same type of economic disruption.

Similarly, about 44% of those who had experienced or expected lost income reported symptoms of depression, compared with about 26% of those who had not experienced or expected economic disruption.

If you or someone you know is struggling to cope, help is available.  The LA County Mental Health hotline (800) 854-7771. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 800-273-8255. The Didi Hirsch Mental Health Hotline is call 800-273-8255. Reaching out is the first step towards knowing you are not alone, and getting help.

Thom File and  Matthew Marlay

 

www.culvercitysymphony.org

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